Memory of the Poor

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Prayer for the unity of Christians. Particular memory of the Christian communities in Europe and the Americas


Reading of the Word of God

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

This is the Gospel of the poor,
liberation for the imprisoned,
sight for the blind,
freedom for the oppressed.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

2 Samuel 5,1-7.10

All the tribes of Israel then came to David at Hebron and said, 'Look, we are your own flesh and bone. In days past when Saul was our king, it was you who led Israel on its campaigns, and to you it was that Yahweh promised, "You are to shepherd my people Israel and be leader of Israel." ' So all the elders of Israel came to the king at Hebron, and King David made a pact with them in Yahweh's presence at Hebron, and they anointed David as king of Israel. David was thirty years old when he became king, and he reigned for forty years. In Hebron he reigned over Judah for seven years and six months; then he reigned in Jerusalem over all Israel and Judah for thirty-three years. The king and his men then marched on Jerusalem, on the Jebusites living in the territory. These said to David, 'You will not get in here. The blind and the lame will hold you off.' (That is to say: David will never get in here.) But David captured the citadel of Zion, that is, the City of David. David grew stronger and stronger, and Yahweh, God of Sabaoth, was with him.

 

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

The Son of Man came to serve,
whoever wants to be great
should become servant of all.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

This passage narrates the moment of David's investiture as king of all Israel. The northern tribes decide to ally themselves with David and propose to him to reign also over Israel. David had not rejoiced at the grief that had befallen the house of Saul, even though this paved the way for national reunification. It is not on blood that David wants to build his kingdom. The decision of the different tribes to gather around him as a single king is accepted by David because he considers it to be the God's will. David knows that it is not because of his own merits that he becomes king, but because of the very work of God who had chosen him in place of Saul, when the latter had made himself unworthy of the gift of kingship. Two events seal the establishment of David's Kingdom: the taking of the fortress of Zion, which will become the capital of the united Kingdom, and the victory over the Philistines (5:17-25). David understood the importance of the conquest: the fortress could be the place where the two kingdoms could reunite. Thus he would secure the one capital, in the centre of the land, halfway between Judah and Israel. David conquered it. And he was crowned king of the only reunited people. He was thirty years old. And Zion will be called the "city of David." David had reunited what had previously been divided. The promise made by God was thus fulfilled: "You shall be shepherd of my people Israel, you shall over ruler of Israel." Truly the Lord "was with him."