Memory of the Mother of the Lord

Ossza Meg


Reading of the Word of God

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

The Spirit of the Lord is upon you.
The child you shall bear will be holy.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

Matthew 5,43-48

'You have heard how it was said, You will love your neighbour and hate your enemy. But I say this to you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you; so that you may be children of your Father in heaven, for he causes his sun to rise on the bad as well as the good, and sends down rain to fall on the upright and the wicked alike. For if you love those who love you, what reward will you get? Do not even the tax collectors do as much? And if you save your greetings for your brothers, are you doing anything exceptional? Do not even the gentiles do as much? You must therefore be perfect, just as your heavenly Father is perfect.'

 

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

Look down, O Lord, on your servants.
Be it unto us according to your word.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

After reminding his disciples about the common say taken from the Book of Leviticus: "You shall love your neighbour and hate your enemy," (19:18) Jesus proposes his Gospel which turns the say upside down: "But I say to you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you." The commandment of love for the enemy is the heart of Gospel message. It was quoted often in the first Christian texts and is presented as the new and proper aspect of Christianity of which pagans are greatly astonished. It was one of the central dimensions of the missionary preaching. Only in the Gospel, however, is there the theme of "love" for enemies while they are, in fact, enemies. It is precisely love for the enemies in their wickedness. It is not a question of loving them too, but of precisely loving them. And the reason for this love lies in God's own behaviour. The commandment of love for the enemy does not correspond to a supposed harmony of creation, but to a direct revelation of God, of his very being. That is why love is the first of the commandments. Exactly because "God is love" for all. Love is therefore the heart of the life of the disciple and of the Church: it is her true wisdom. This love is in stark contrast with a conception of human wisdom that includes feelings of hatred and vengeance as reasonable. Jesus put it into practice when, from the cross, he prayed for his executioners. And many martyrs, starting from Stephen, lived with the same spirit. Certainly, this kind of love does not come from men and women and even less from the natural outpouring of our hearts: it comes from Heaven, from God who lets his sun rise on the good and the evil, without partiality. God grants His love to all gratuitously. Disciples are called to live in this horizon of love that comes from Heaven and transforms the Earth. There is a "beyond" of the Gospel that we cannot suppress: "46For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have?" If we welcome his love, we are on the way to God's perfection. In a time when the logic of opposition and the search for the enemy reign, the exhortation to love our enemies is liberating. Only thus love truly prevails.